JISC Research Data Network Workshop

Today I attended the JISC Research Data Network Workshop hosted this time by Cardiff University. So far we know research data services are desirable (priority): there is a growing demand for managing heterogeneous and growing volumes of data across the entire research lifecycle; we know that research data services are possible (feasibility): there is an increasing array of on-premise and in-cloud platforms to select from; the challenge, certainly for us at least, is making these services sustainable, secure and manageable (viability). The RDN meeting provides an opportunity to find out more about good practice in the sector. Of particular interest today is less the technology and more the work JISC has been supporting around the business case and costing models for research data management.

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MARC’d This Week

ICYMI: Things I’ve found worth mentioning, amplifying, reading and collecting from the last few days.

Last Tuesday I followed JISC Digital Festival 2015 remotely thanks to Twitter and the live streaming of keynotes and selected sessions.  It’s not a complete experience but a good way to at least partially enjoy a conference when you have a cold, a twisted ankle and a student budget.  I particularly enjoyed the keynote by Professor Carole Goble on e-Science and research publication (brief notes | slides | recording).

Having discovered the Encyclopaedia of Life last week, this week I was introduced to the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which provides the literature component of the EOL, thanks to a talk in the Big Data and the Dark Arts session.

Interesting article ‘Bits and Pieces of Information: Bibliographic Modeling of Transmedia’ by Ana Vukadin in Cataloging & Classification Quarterly (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01639374.2013.879976) looks at how FRBR or FRBRoo (an attempt to harmonise FRBR with CIDOC CRM) can be used to catalogue narratives that span multiple media platforms.

It is an approach to multi-part works that might also help cataloguing the multi-various Research Objects mentioned in Carole Goble’s keynote though, there is alread a ro ontology.

This week’s exciting conference was User Experience in Libraries (#UXLibs), a library-focused event on delivering great services to users. Whilst it was possible to follow remotely this was a conference intended for attending. The format of a keynote then practical team sessions followed by a Q&A wrap-up each day looked like a really interesting active conference format: rethinking the conference experience, not just the library.