MARC’d This Week

ICYMI: Things I’ve found worth mentioning, amplifying, reading and collecting from the last few days.

The Guardian takes Poll Data Visualisation to A New Level with its Election 2015 Poll Projection.

Inquiring Minds Podcast Episode 75 with Kevin Kelly – What Technology Wants. I blogged in more detail about how interesting this was.

I came to The Encyclopaedia of Life via Kevin Kelly’s website and a former project of his to catalogue and identify every living species on earth by giving it its own web page. This led to me to The Global Names Architecture (GNA) for connection biological information.

Also via Kevin Kelly, The Quantified Self a blog all about self knowledge through numbers and Wink: remarkable books that belong on paper.

The Museum of Modern Art exhibition page Access to Tools: Publications from the Whole Earth Catalog, 1968-1974

On our #citylis #infodomains theme of Healthcare information I added The Wellness Syndrome / Carl Cederström and André Spicer published by Polity examining the modern ideology of wellness to my want to read list.

Combining the Quantified Self and Healthcare Information I read this intriguing article on building your own pancreas. It uses data from internet of things (IoT) type devices with a hacker mentality to create new, and social systems, for monitoring and medicating diabetes. There is an interesting point made about “data and free speech” but the potential legal grey area of DIY code and healthcare regulation.

This little video, also from the Quantified Self blog, is about time tracking. Greg Kroleski talks about 6 years spent tracking his time. The methodology (one week every quarter in a spreadsheet) and visualisation (mostly graphs) are not that unusual but as well as the raw data what I found interesting was the ‘taxonomy of time’ he developed to categories his activities and the difficulties of categorising.

Interesting post on Visualising Data on the use of pink and blue, or not, for gendered visualisation. Potentially relevant to a project I’m thinking of working on for my #dataviz assignment.

Interesting post by Sara M. Watson in DIS Magazine on metaphors used to describe big data. they have a current issue all about data which provides a critical look at “the datalogical turn” since 1948:

“Since World War II, information theory has had many offspring, all of which share fundamental traits: that the composition of information must be binary, and thus digital, compressible, reversible, predictable, scalable, and measurable. What has been most urgent as of late is the development of critical theoretical positions that follow the spread of such platforms over society at large. Subjects are not just actors in a network, but also network architects themselves, both supplicator and designer in an increasingly automated sociality.” – Marvin Jordan and Mike Pepi

Rob Kitchin’s article on Continuous Geosurveillance in the “Smart City” is worth a read anyway but even more so for the striking original artwork by Mark Dorf.

#citylisters love the History of Documents so they might be interested in this history of big data by Bernard Marr.

Great visualisation by Allison McCann on women’s sports data. Ok tongue in cheek there, but it demonstrates how second class women’s sport still is.

Meanwhile the Washington Post highlight a debate between the US and The Netherlands over marijuana usage featuring what they describe as a “passive aggressive infographic”. Remember folks information may be beautiful but it’s not always neutral!

For International Women’s Day (8th March) the Economist has an interactive visualisation the best place in the world to be a working women.

Published by

Alison Pope

Four days a week I'm a business analyst and information architect, designing systems to open up scholarship and higher education; one day a week I'm a humanities scholar; one day a week I'm a housekeeper; one day a week I'm at play, traversing landscapes in mind or in motion, or at rest.

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